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Gamete competition, gamete limitation, and the evolution of the two sexes

Overview of attention for article published in MHR : Basic Science of Reproductive Medicine, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 1,106)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
428 tweeters
wikipedia
13 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
Title
Gamete competition, gamete limitation, and the evolution of the two sexes
Published in
MHR : Basic Science of Reproductive Medicine, October 2014
DOI 10.1093/molehr/gau068
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jussi Lehtonen, Geoff A. Parker

Abstract

Males and females are a fundamental aspect of human reproduction, yet procreation is perfectly possible without this division into two sexes. Biologically, males are defined as the sex that produces the smaller gametes (e.g. sperm), implying that the male and female sexes only exist in species with gamete dimorphism (anisogamy). Our ancestors were isogamous, meaning that only one gamete size was produced. The question of the evolutionary origin of males and females is then synonymous to asking what evolutionary pressures caused gamete sizes to diverge. Studying the ancestral evolutionary divergence of males and females relies largely on mathematical modelling. Here, we review two classes of models explaining the evolutionary origin of males and females: gamete competition and gamete limitation. These seemingly alternative explanations are not mutually exclusive, but two aspects of a single evolutionary process. Once evolved, anisogamy and the two sexes are evolutionarily very stable. This explains the maintenance of anisogamy in organisms with internal fertilization, which can cause large decreases in both gamete competition and gamete limitation. The ancestral divergence and maintenance of gamete sizes subsequently led to many other differences we now observe between the two sexes, sowing the seeds for what we have become.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 428 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 108 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 24 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 17%
Researcher 18 16%
Student > Master 15 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 5%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 16 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 351. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2022.
All research outputs
#65,283
of 21,293,646 outputs
Outputs from MHR : Basic Science of Reproductive Medicine
#2
of 1,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#663
of 252,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age from MHR : Basic Science of Reproductive Medicine
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,293,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,106 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,775 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.