↓ Skip to main content

Oxford University Press

Article Metrics

Potato Consumption Does Not Increase Blood Pressure or Incident Hypertension in 2 Cohorts of Spanish Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nutrition, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
Title
Potato Consumption Does Not Increase Blood Pressure or Incident Hypertension in 2 Cohorts of Spanish Adults
Published in
Journal of Nutrition, October 2017
DOI 10.3945/jn.117.252254
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily A Hu, Miguel A Martínez-González, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Dolores Corella, Emilio Ros, Montse Fitó, Antonio Garcia-Rodriguez, Ramon Estruch, Fernando Arós, Miquel Fiol, José Lapetra, Lluís Serra-Majem, Xavier Pintó, Miguel Ruiz-Canela, Cristina Razquin, Mònica Bulló, José V Sorlí, Helmut Schröder, Casey M Rebholz, Estefania Toledo

Abstract

Background: Potatoes have a high glycemic load but also antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. It is unclear what mechanisms are involved in relation to their effect on blood pressure (BP) and hypertension.Objectives: This study aimed to assess the association between potato consumption, BP changes, and the risk of hypertension in 2 Spanish populations.Methods: Separate analyses were performed in PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea), a multicenter nutrition intervention trial of adults aged 55-80 y, and the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) project, a prospective cohort made up of university graduates and educated adults with ages (means ± SDs) of 42.7 ± 13.3 y for men and 35.1 ± 10.7 y for women. In PREDIMED, generalized estimating equations adjusted for lifestyle and dietary characteristics were used to assess changes in BP across quintiles of total potato consumption during a 4-y follow-up. Controlled BP values (systolic BP <140 mm Hg and diastolic BP <90 mm Hg) during follow-up were also assessed. For SUN, multivariate-adjusted HRs for incident hypertension during a mean 6.7-y follow-up were calculated.Results: In PREDIMED, the total potato intake was 81.9 ± 40.6 g/d. No overall differences in systolic or diastolic BP changes were detected based on consumption of potatoes. For total potatoes, the mean difference in change between quintile 5 (highest intake) and quintile 1 (lowest intake) in systolic BP after multivariate adjustment was -0.90 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.56, 0.76 mm Hg; P-trend = 0.1) and for diastolic BP was -0.02 mm Hg (95% CI: -0.93, 0.89 mm Hg; P-trend = 0.8). In SUN, the total potato consumption was 52.7 ± 33.6 g/d, and no significant association between potato consumption and hypertension incidence was observed in the fully adjusted HR for total potato consumption (quintile 5 compared with quintile 1: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.80, 1.19; P-trend = 0.8).Conclusions: Potato consumption is not associated with changes over 4 y in blood pressure among older adults in Spain or with the risk of hypertension among Spanish adults. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 22%
Unspecified 11 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 13%
Professor 7 11%
Student > Master 6 9%
Other 18 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 33%
Unspecified 17 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2017.
All research outputs
#591,577
of 13,405,025 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nutrition
#586
of 6,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,961
of 312,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nutrition
#8
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,405,025 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.