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Total and subtypes of dietary fat intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
55 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
Title
Total and subtypes of dietary fat intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2017
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.116.142034
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Guasch-Ferré, Nerea Becerra-Tomás, Miguel Ruiz-Canela, Dolores Corella, Helmut Schröder, Ramon Estruch, Emilio Ros, Fernando Arós, Enrique Gómez-Gracia, Miquel Fiol, Lluís Serra-Majem, José Lapetra, Josep Basora, Nerea Martín-Calvo, Olga Portoles, Montserrat Fitó, Frank B Hu, Lluís Forga, Jordi Salas-Salvadó

Abstract

Background: The associations between dietary fat and cardiovascular disease have been evaluated in several studies, but less is known about their influence on the risk of diabetes.Objective: We examined the associations between total fat, subtypes of dietary fat, and food sources rich in saturated fatty acids and the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D).Design: A prospective cohort analysis of 3349 individuals who were free of diabetes at baseline but were at high cardiovascular risk from the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) study was conducted. Detailed dietary information was assessed at baseline and yearly during the follow-up using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate T2D HRs and 95% CIs according to baseline and yearly updated fat intake.Results: We documented 266 incident cases during 4.3 y of follow-up. Baseline saturated and animal fat intake was not associated with the risk of T2D. After multivariable adjustment, participants in the highest quartile of updated intake of saturated and animal fat had a higher risk of diabetes than the lowest quartile (HR: 2.19; 95% CI: 1.28, 3.73; and P-trend = 0.01 compared with HR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.29, 3.09; and P-trend < 0.01, respectively). In both the Mediterranean diet and control groups, participants in the highest quartile of updated animal fat intake had an ∼2-fold higher risk of T2D than their counterparts in the lowest quartile. The consumption of 1 serving of butter and cheese was associated with a higher risk of diabetes, whereas whole-fat yogurt intake was associated with a lower risk.Conclusions: In a Mediterranean trial focused on dietary fat interventions, baseline intake of saturated and animal fat was not associated with T2D incidence, but the yearly updated intake of saturated and animal fat was associated with a higher risk of T2D. Cheese and butter intake was associated with a higher risk of T2D, whereas whole-fat yogurt intake was associated with a lower risk of T2D. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN35739639.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 77 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 16 20%
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Master 12 15%
Other 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 27 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 25 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Other 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 125. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2019.
All research outputs
#123,537
of 13,652,101 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#421
of 9,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,428
of 258,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#12
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,652,101 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,639 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,278 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.